Category Archives: Love Family

Newark Evening News- September 27, 1890

Note: I did not transcribe these articles from the original. They were initially transcribed by Grace Leonard who has been working on the Love genealogy off and on for many years.

Newark Evening News; Saturday, September 27, 1890; Page 4;

HOW MRS. LOVE DIED

The Husband Held to Answer for Her Mysterious Death.

The jury empanelled by Coroner Roden to sit at the inquest in the case of Mrs. William W. W. Love returned a verdict yesterday afternoon setting forth that the woman came to her death September 22 from injuries received in falling down the cellar stairs of her residence in Roseland and that her husband was responsible for the fall.

The first witness examined yesterday was George DeCamp, who helped carry Mrs. Love upstairs. Her two children told him their parents had quarreled and their father pushed their mother down the cellar. Love said to witness and Constable Teed that his wife was only drunk and he did not desire any of their interference in his family affairs.

Constable Teed swore Love said he wished his wife would die, and several other witnesses also testified to his making the assertion. Love is out on bail at present, but he will probably be arrested and sent to jail to stand trial for manslaughter.

Love Family from my Family File, click for bigger

Newark Evening News; Monday, September 29, 1890; Page 1;

Love Not to be Rearrested

William W. W. Love, of Roseland, whom a coroner’s jury last week found responsible for causing the death of his wife, whom he threw down the cellar stairs at their home, is not to be rearrested. Constable Teed, who took Love into custody soon after the woman received her injuries, consulted with Prosecutor Crane about the matter, but as the latter decided that as Love was already under $1,000 bail for his appearance when wanted, he need not be rearrested.

Grace attempted to find further articles but was unsuccessful at the time. Leaving the outcome a mystery for us at the current time, thought we’re both pretty sure he didn’t have jail time.

Newark Evening News- September 25, 1890

Note: I did not transcribe these articles from the original. They were initially transcribed by Grace Leonard who has been working on the Love genealogy off and on for many years. It was this article that I was mostly hesitant account. There is a very emotional account given by my great-great grandmother Jennie Love-Thorward.

Newark Evening News; Thursday, September 25, 1890; Page 1

IS LOVE RESPONSIBLE?

HIS WIFE’S MYSTERIOUS DEATH

The case of Mrs. Love, Who Died at Livingston from Injuries, Inquired Into — Testimony Showing That the Couple Frequently Quarrelled

Coroner Roden began an investigation at the Courthouse yesterday afternoon in the circumstances attending the death of Mrs. William W. W. Love, of Roseland, who died from injuries received by a fall down the cellar stairs at her home on September 13. There were rumors that Love had pushed or thrown the woman down the stairs, and color was given to the statement by the fact that the couple were frequently quarrelling. Constable Teed arrested Love, and he gave bail in $1,000 to appear when wanted. The jury empanelled by the Coroner was composed of Z. H. DeCamp, James Harrison, Frank E. Williams, Walter D. Bush, C.R. Conklin, W.W. DeCamp and William Griffith, all of Roseland.

The first witness called was Alfred Love, the twelve-year-old son of the couple. The boy was in no wise embarrassed and gave his testimony in a straightforward manner. He swore that when he returned on the night of the tragedy, he found his mother absent but she soon returned. “She got supper ready and called father,” said the boy witness, “and then passed into the pantry while father was eating his supper. There was a quarrel and she tore father’s shirt. She slipped and fell down stairs.”

Upon cross-examination by Prosecutor Crane, witness said that he had been to Paterson with his father that day and the latter was angry at not finding his wife at home when he returned. She was at the house of one of her daughters nearby and she did not return for an hour. Love laid down on a lounge and went to sleep.

“Can you tell when a man is drunk?” asked Mr. Crane.

“No, I can’t,” said the witness.

QUARRELED AT THE SUPPER TABLE

“There was a quarrel at the supper table,” continued the boy, “but I don’t know what they said.” Mr. Crane’s questions had the effect of making the witness relapse into silence, he evidently becoming afraid to speak. He finally said he was sent to bed without his supper and that his sister knew about the rest of it. “Mother and Father were fighting,” added the boy, “and were pushing each other around the room. I went upstairs and heard Mother and my sister howling. Then I called for help for Mother who was lying on the cellar floor.”

The next witness was Jennie, the fourteen-year-old daughter of the dead woman.

Upon taking the stand she began weeping, and it was with difficulty that she could be sufficiently composed to give her testimony. She thought her father had been drinking when he came in and laid down on a lounge in the parlor. He and witness’s mother had a few words and afterward the latter went to the pantry for a bottle of beer. They had words over it and she caught him by the throat. There was a struggle and her mother fell down the cellar stairs. Her father made no attempt to go after her, and she laid at the bottom of the stairs until Constable Teed came in and removed her.

OFTEN FOUGHT BEFORE

“They have often fought before and hurt each other,” said the girl, “and I did not want them to do it again. Mother had about ten bottles of beer in the pantry that day and sent out for six more.”

At this point Lawyer Charles Graves, representing Love, asked the girl whether her mother had been drinking and was in the habit of drinking. She replied that she had.

“You can’t ask any more questions, Mr. Graves,” interposed the Coroner.

“I’d like to know why?” queried the lawyer.

“Because you haven’t the right to,” replied the Coroner.

“I have a right and purpose exercising it, too,” said the lawyer.

“If you do I’ll have you ejected; I am holding this inquest,” concluded Doctor Roden.

Dr. Peck testified that Mrs. Love was in a semi-conscious condition from the time she received her injuries until death. There was a discoloration on her neck. County Physician Wrightson swore that the woman was injured on both sides of the head and her skull was fractured, producing an effusion of blood and causing death. Dr. Wrightson said he did not think all the wounds could have been caused by falling downstairs. The inquest will be continued tomorrow afternoon.

Newark Evening News- September 23, 1890

I did have reservations about posting these transcriptions. My new long lost cousin sent me these this week and it’s been kind of an up in the air decision for me. I’ve been pretty open about what happened between William W Love and his wife Jennie Menzies though. I’ve come a long way and I feel a special connection to the Menzies family. So that’s why I decided that the story should be told and my family who read this blog would be interested in seeing the articles also. This is nothing you can’t find in the paper if you search it yourself, so who am I to censor the blog when I never have before?

Note: I did not transcribe these articles from the original. They were initially transcribed by Grace Leonard who has been working on the Love genealogy off and on for many years.

Newark Evening News; Tuesday, September 23, 1890; Page 1;

THE FALL PROVED FATAL

Mrs. Love died yesterday from the effects of her injuries

Mrs. W W Love, who was found in an unconscious condition at the foot of the cellar stairs in her house at Caldwell on Saturday, September 13, died yesterday afternoon from the effects of the injuries she received. Dr. Peck, of Caldwell, who has attended her since the accident occured, notified County Physician Wrightson of her death. The case has given rise to grave suspicions, as a short time before the woman fell a disturbance took place at the house, and it is believed that some one threw her downstairs in a quarrel.

The woman was badly cut about the head and her body was bruised. She improved rapidly until Thursday, but on that day inflammation set in and she continued to grow worse until yesterday, when she died, without saying a word to any one about the cause of her accident.

The family have lived in Caldwell over five years, previous to which time they lived in Newark, where the husband kept a large grocery store.

Jane Menzies-Love, from Llewellyn's photographs.

Newark Evening News; Wednesday, September 24, 1890; Page 1;

MRS. LOVE’S DEATH

An Inquest in the case to be held today

An inquest in the case of Mrs. Wm. H. W. W. Love, of Caldwell, who died from injuries received at her home recently, will be held at the Courthouse this afternoon. Detectives Volk and O’Connor, of the Prosecutor’s office, have been investigating the case, but could find no direct evidence that the woman had been pushed or thrown down the cellar stairs by her husband, as there was no one in the house when she received her injuries except Love and herself.

County Physician Wrightson examined the body yesterday afternoon and found that the woman had died from a fractured skull and concussion of the brain.

More articles coming this Saturday and Sunday.

Mystery Monday: Success!

I thought it would be fun to re-visit some of my past Mystery Monday posts to let you know how some have been solved!

Mystery Monday: Beulah Miller – link

I’m so glad I’m going through all my photos and documents with a more experienced eye! You see I was transcribing Llewellyn’s Wedding Gift registry book to share with my new connection, and I noticed something new! Beulah Miller is listed in the registry! I quickly looked through my photos and scanned the picture again. This time I scanned the back also. As you can see, the date is given as July 22, 1923 and Beulah is listed as being from Caldwell, NJ. What struck me is Beulah’s address in the registry. I quickly verified that Beulah was living next door to Llewellyn’s future in-laws! I don’t know if the Brooklyn Moores had moved to New Jersey yet. The only thing I know is the William was working in NYC, but he always worked there so that was no help. Very interesting!

Sources

  1. Llewellyn’s Photo Archives
  2. Llewellyn’s Wedding Registry Book
  3. 1920 United States Federal Census; Caldwell, Essex County, New Jersey; ED 22, page 17A, dwelling 366, family 382;

Mystery Monday: Duncan Walker’s Family – link

The next one I’m here to update you on is Duncan Walker’s family. Through my new connection, Grace, I learned that William Wallace Love had a sister named Martha who married Duncan Walker. I haven’t found the official proof yet, of course (I state this just so people understand it is still hearsay until I have official documentation). These women are Martha Love-Walker’s daughters!

Of course, just because it’s not official yet, doesn’t mean I’ll ignore census records! I think it’s less of a coincidence that Duncan and Martha Walker are living next door to Andrew and Agnes Love in 1880.

Sources

  1. Llewellyn’s Photo Archives
  2. Grace Leonard
  3. 1880 United States Federal Census; Fanwood, Union County, New Jersey; ED 180, page 365C, dwelling 20, family 21;

Why I Blog

This Monday, I posted my Mystery Monday post on Duncan Walker’s family. When I first started posting Mystery Mondays, it was with the hope that some day I used the right keywords for a Google search to send answers my way. Maybe I’d get lucky and someone would be able to discern a place or the time period of a photo to help me.

This week, more then I expected happened. At some point last week, I received some blog comments from Grace Leonard (Hi Grace!). I quickly shot off an email to her because she’s connected to me through the Love/Menzies line and I just loooove that line (pun intended). Plus it’s so rare that I get people actually researching the same lines as me, I couldn’t let her comments go unanswered!

It turns out Grace is a little more familiar with the Love line then I am! In fact, she could identify Duncan Walker and his family! Oh gosh, it felt like Christmas! According to Grace and the dearly missed Everett Leonard, Duncan Walker married William Wallace Love‘s sister Martha! Now all I have to do is find the documentation to back it up!

Grace also let me know that it isn’t easy to get Jane Menzies-Love‘s death certificate. It’s getting harder and harder to get information about this woman and the circumstances surrounding her death! I’m thinking ordering the 1890 Essex County, NJ deaths microfilm from the Family History Center might be the best bet.  I’m chomping at the bit to get going on my New Jersey research and I think I might overcome my shyness to finally go in and order my first microfilm!

Also, a few changes:

As of yesterday I turned off the captcha filter on the website. I didn’t realize how much people hated it! No one complained to me about it here but if this makes it easier for people to enjoy my blog, then it’s a change I’m more than happy to make! I also turned off the requirement for an email address. Emails are never published on the blog, but they are viewable to me in the administrative side. I was only utilizing that to get back to people who were seeking family information. So if you’re looking for information, be sure to leave your email or look in the sidebar for my email!

Hopefully this blog will be easier to navigate in the coming months when my site redesign is finished. If I have to pull some late nights I’m determined to finish this once and for all! It’s driving me bonkers! I’ve mainly been focusing on the content, but now that I’m into a rhythm, I think it’s time to finally make that design I’ve wanted from the beginning!

Unknown Cityscape

Yes I am still incapable of posting without the use of a picture. :)

Mystery Monday: Duncan Walker’s Family

I love that I’m organizing my research. I love even more that it’s giving me an opportunity to look at every piece of documentation that I have in my possession. Before I started my organization, I was just so overwhelmed by the amount of stuff I had. It was tiring just to look at it. Now I’m making heads and tails of it and finding little clues where I didn’t notice them before. Something as simple as remembering to scan the back of a photograph.

Duncan Walker's Family

At first glance, you might think this is just a normal Christmas car. At least that’s what I thought at first. However, last week I scanned this into my computer and I followed the advice from Elyse Doerflinger’s ebook and I scanned the back too. Why didn’t I do that before? It’s so simple and I should have done that. It doesn’t matter now. The fact is I started my scan project last week and when I scanned the back of the above photograph, a lightbulb went off. In fact, this light bulb was probably one of the brightest light bulbs I’ve had.

As you can see, it says “Duncan Walker’s family.” Then it lists the names of the women in the photograph. The name Walker jumped up and hit me on the head! It was Walkers that are listed on the Love “Diner Tree”! They’re also listed on my Love-Menzies Family Outline that Llewellyn worked on at one point. I have this list in about four different stages, including handwritten. So now I just have to figure out how Duncan Walker is connected to the Loves!

What I know about this photo

  • Duncan Walker is connected to the Love side of my family.
  • This is probably where I inherited my horrible vision from.

What I want to know about this photo

  • How is Duncan Walker and his family connected to the Love side of my family?
Mystery Monday is a series I post here on Mondays. It is also a weekly blogging topic on GeneaBloggers. Feel free to post your own mystery photos and link me to them!